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Evita

Date

13th June 2019

Society

Windmill Productions

Venue

Rutherglen Town Hall

Type of Production

Musical

Director

Alan C. Jones

Musical Director

David Fisher

Choreographer

Marie McElhinney

Report

Author: Liz Daniels

Windmill Productions, new to Rutherglen Town Hall, took the hall on a journey from its multi-purpose venue to giving audiences a real intimate theatrical experience.   

From the opening of the show where we witnessed the funeral of Eva, we were transported back to 1934, where the piece picked up her life. This production brought us the drama through music as the story unfolded telling of the characters in Eva’s life and her determination to succeed as the most powerful woman in Argentina.

Eva, played by Vanessa Sedgwick showed her vocal ability in her interpretation of the role. Supported by Jim McPhee, playing Perón, he brought a wealth of experience to the role, with his vocal ability and drama in equal measure. Raymond Morrison, Magaldi played the role with ease, and style. The Mistress, Gillian Black brought real emotion to the famous song Another Suitcase In Another Hall, and Chè, played by Martin Agnew, never lost the characterisation of the role from both a dramatic and vocal sense, displaying his vocal ability in rock singing when required.

The ensemble captured the drama right from the beginning and the audience sensed every part of emotion coming from the cast throughout the production. They worked hard, and the execution of the piece demonstrated the experience of the cast.

The entire look of this show was stylised, and in particular the detail of hair, wigs and make-up, and consistency in the period style of the costumes, was evident. The attention to detail really shone through. 

The band was positioned stage right bringing a very cohesive feel to the whole production. Under the direction of David Fisher, the vocals across the entire cast were tight with excellent harmony singing, and well connected with the band. Choreography by Marie McElhinney was stylised and precise, and while the playing area on the stage was limited, this did not hinder any of the dance and movement throughout the production.  

From a technical point of view, the set, an open design constructed by Jack Murdoch and designed by Margot Traynor complemented the production beautifully. Lighting design by Mike Pendlowski brought real atmosphere to the production. The direction of the production was in the capable hands of Alan C. Jones, and with a dedicated production team, Windmill rightly say, they are a new production company with a wealth of experience, and credit must be given to them in bringing a show of this standard to the stage.

 

 

 

 

 

 Windmill Productions, new to Rutherglen Town Hall, took the hall on a journey from its multi-purpose venue to giving audiences a real intimate theatrical experience.   

 

From the opening of the show where we witnessed the funeral of Eva, we were transported back to 1934, where the piece picked up her life. This production brought us the drama through music as the story unfolded telling of the characters in Eva’s life and her determination to succeed as the most powerful woman in Argentina.

 

Eva, played by Vanessa Sedgwick showed her vocal ability in her interpretation of the role.  Supported by Jim McPhee, playing Perón, he brought a wealth of experience to the role, with his vocal ability and drama in equal measure.    Raymond Morrison, Magaldi played the role with ease, and style.  The Mistress, Gillian Black brought real emotion to the famous song Another Suitcase In Another Hall, and Chè, played by Martin Agnew, never lost the characterisation of the role from both a dramatic and vocal sense, displaying his vocal ability in rock singing when required.

 

The ensemble captured the drama right from the beginning and the audience sensed every part of emotion coming from the cast throughout the production.  They worked hard, and the execution of the piece demonstrated the experience of the cast.

 

The entire look of this show was stylised, and in particular the detail of hair, wigs and make-up, and consistency in the period style of the costumes, was evident.  The attention to detail really shone through. 

 

The band was positioned stage right bringing a very cohesive feel to the whole production.  Under the direction of David Fisher, the vocals across the entire cast were tight with excellent harmony singing, and well connected with the band.  Choreography by Marie McElhinney was stylised and precise, and while the playing area on the stage was limited, this did not hinder any of the dance and movement throughout the production.  

 

From a technical point of view, the set, an open design constructed by Jack Murdoch and designed by Margot Traynor complemented the production beautifully.  Lighting design by Mike Pendlowski brought real atmosphere to the production.  The direction of the production was in the capable hands of Alan C. Jones, and with a dedicated production team, Windmill rightly say, they are a new production company with a wealth of experience, and credit must be given to them in bringing a show of this standard to the stage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Windmill Productions, new to Rutherglen Town Hall, took the hall on a journey from its multi-purpose venue to giving audiences a real intimate theatrical experience.   

 

From the opening of the show where we witnessed the funeral of Eva, we were transported back to 1934, where the piece picked up her life. This production brought us the drama through music as the story unfolded telling of the characters in Eva’s life and her determination to succeed as the most powerful woman in Argentina.

 

Eva, played by Vanessa Sedgwick showed her vocal ability in her interpretation of the role.  Supported by Jim McPhee, playing Perón, he brought a wealth of experience to the role, with his vocal ability and drama in equal measure.    Raymond Morrison, Magaldi played the role with ease, and style.  The Mistress, Gillian Black brought real emotion to the famous song Another Suitcase In Another Hall, and Chè, played by Martin Agnew, never lost the characterisation of the role from both a dramatic and vocal sense, displaying his vocal ability in rock singing when required.

 

The ensemble captured the drama right from the beginning and the audience sensed every part of emotion coming from the cast throughout the production.  They worked hard, and the execution of the piece demonstrated the experience of the cast.

 

The entire look of this show was stylised, and in particular the detail of hair, wigs and make-up, and consistency in the period style of the costumes, was evident.  The attention to detail really shone through. 

 

The band was positioned stage right bringing a very cohesive feel to the whole production.  Under the direction of David Fisher, the vocals across the entire cast were tight with excellent harmony singing, and well connected with the band.  Choreography by Marie McElhinney was stylised and precise, and while the playing area on the stage was limited, this did not hinder any of the dance and movement throughout the production.  

 

From a technical point of view, the set, an open design constructed by Jack Murdoch and designed by Margot Traynor complemented the production beautifully.  Lighting design by Mike Pendlowski brought real atmosphere to the production.  The direction of the production was in the capable hands of Alan C. Jones, and with a dedicated production team, Windmill rightly say, they are a new production company with a wealth of experience, and credit must be given to them in bringing a show of this standard to the stage.